Xavier University (XU)

Cincinnati, OH

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Xavier University

Xavier University

XU Reviews

Overall School Rating:

Rated 4 of 5 Stars 1 Review

Campus Facilities:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
Nightlife:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
On Campus Dining:
Rated 3 of 5 Stars
Diversity:
Rated 5 of 5 Stars
Housing:
Rated 3 of 5 Stars
Athletics:
Rated 5 of 5 Stars
Safety & Security:
Rated 5 of 5 Stars
Job/Career Placement:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
Off Campus Dining:
Rated 3 of 5 Stars
Local Atmosphere:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
Academics:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
College Life:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars

Student Ratings

Reviews for Xavier University

Former Student - Last Attended 1995

Overall Rating

Detailed Ratings

Campus Facilities:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
Nightlife:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
On Campus Dining:
Rated 3 of 5 Stars
Diversity:
Rated 5 of 5 Stars
Housing:
Rated 3 of 5 Stars
Athletics:
Rated 5 of 5 Stars
Safety & Security:
Rated 5 of 5 Stars
Greek Life:
Rated n/a of 5 Stars
Job/Career Placement:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
Off Campus Dining:
Rated 3 of 5 Stars
Local Atmosphere:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
Academics:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
College Life:
Rated 4 of 5 Stars
Overall

When I was looking at colleges, I didn't quite know what I wanted to do, but I wanted to move away from home to a city that would be large enough for me to find a job in once I graduated. In Ohio, that narrows down the choices a bit because so many of the schools are in smaller cities surrounded by rural areas. So I liked the location of Xavier, being in Cincinnati. Moving to a city of that size was a perfect transition of moving away from home and living on my own for the first time - even if it was in a dorm room. The campus has changed a lot since then, and there's been roads closed, green space built in, very large new construction projects (there was always some sort of major project in my 5 years there), a new on campus sport arena, new university center, etc, so I can't really say much about getting around on campus, except that it's not HUGE, so walking from one side to the other was about 15 min. tops. What I really liked about that campus was that it felt like a village. The dorms were close to each other, somewhat in the center, and classroom buildings were in their own section. For the most part, I never had to be in scattered areas of campus on the same day. Had I know exactly what I wanted to do "when I grew up" (I now work on the business side of the music industry, and I didn't really get any exposure to that while I was there. I probably wouldn't have chosen to go to Xavier or I would have chosen a different path while there, but now I can't imagine life without having lived those years where, with whom, and how I did. (I'm sure a lot of people can say that about their college experiences tho.

Academics

I didn't chose my final major until the last semester of my junior year, so I know I had an extra year coming. There was one semester I had all business classes as a result and no creative classes to break up the use of my left brain. My grades suffered as a result, so that's one tip I would give for prospective students of any school - or for advisers helping students choose their workload. I liked the consortium with other Ohio and neighboring universities. I took summer classes at Kent State U and Univ. of Cincy, and learned a lot about myself while experiencing life on other campuses and from talking to other students in those classes at the time I didn't really have a favorite professor, but I did keep in contact with my original adviser (Dr. Moulton/International Affairs) throughout my college career even though I dropped my original major after the 1st year. Class size was pretty much perfect for everything. Most rooms were no bigger than regular h.s. classrooms, so there were normally around 30 students, I think. I had a few lecture hall classes, but they were usually business major pre-req's/required. I definitely enjoyed the liberal arts side of the education. Having to take philosophy and theology weren't too bad (although I wasn't' looking forward to it when I got started, being a non-religious person. If you choose the right classes that fulfill those requirements that match your interests, they can be very rewarding. Knowing a bit about the prof helps as well, tho. My Theology 101 teacher (who was a nun) taught all types of religions ranging from early early tribal beliefs to Hindu, Muslim, Buddhism, Judaism, and then only spent a coupla weeks on Christianity in general, not focusing on Catholicism. Whereas, a close friend who lived across the hall and was brought up protestant like myself, had a teacher who taught his own book on Catholicism. I got the luck of the draw and reeeally enjoyed that class, where my friend reeeally didn't like her's.

College Life

The social atmosphere was definitely positive. There were no major sororities or frats other than academic and African American groups, so there was no pressure to fit in within any type of greek life. Both the dorms and the SAC put together either weekly or monthly events that just became a part of your routine. Like pasta night in the studio where one of the well known and liked Brothers lived on campus. Movies, outside on the lawn between dorm buildings. The freshman orientation "Manresa" was probably one of the more positive experiences I had, socially, while there. It was amazing how quickly people became friends, and I know of many of us who are still close friends with folks we met during that first week, either in our small group, or in some of the larger group "ok, find everyone who's born in the same month as you" types of mixers. Then you see some of those folks in your first day of classes and it just jumps you from being a timid "oh my gosh, I don't know what I'm doing" freshman to, a more outgoing "hey! I met you the other day - what's your name again? what building are you going to? me to! where is it?!" freshman. Finding an organization or club to fit your hobbies or interests was pretty easy. Each year the sort of "career fair" for clubs set up outside the dorms and basically became a gauntlet of enthusiastic members recruiting others like themselves. If a club you enjoy didn't exist, the support to create it yourself was there, without at doubt. Safety was decent. There were always shuttles running at night if you needed to go from one side of campus back to the other and didn't want to walk in the dark. The surrounding neighborhoods at the time, were blue collar to lower income, so some folks didn't feel safe walking from off-campus housing sometimes, but stuff can happen anywhere, you just have to be careful. Weekend activities mostly included sports and parties, for me, at least. Being a D1 school, the athletics were top notch, and always competitive and a lot of fun. As I mentioned, since there isn't a real Greek life, parties were thrown by housemates and some off-campus/landlord-owned houses became known for their parties, but that depended on who was renting that house each year. There were 2 all-class formal dances each year, which, I totally appreciate now that I look back on them. Everyone should learn how to dress up and be formal at some point, and going thru that back then (more than just senior prom) was a lot of fun. (I've gone to a few formal weddings in the last coupla months, so that's why I've been looking back on those formal dances at XU fondly recently. :)


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Xavier University

Xavier University

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