Student Organizations: An Overview

From African-American Society to Zombie Awareness Council, explore the ins and outs of student clubs and organizations.

Photo: Thinkstock

No matter where your interests lie, you are almost assured to find a student organization that matches them. Student organization and clubs a great way to meet new people, explore new interests and contribute to your college’s intellectual and social life.

Along with a place to meet and access to facilities and resources, student clubs often receive funding from your university. Students clubs are designed to serve the needs of students. So, if you can’t find the club you’re looking for, start your own. Generally, all you have to do is meet with faculty members, complete a simple registration process, and you’re on your way.

Student Organizations

Here is a brief list of some of the many different groups that exist at universities across the country. While schools with a larger student body will have a larger pool of groups, every school fields college clubs across a variety of areas.

  • Religious Clubs: Groups such as Arizona State’s LoveASU works to bring together individuals from all denominations for prayer and worship. Its purpose is to add a forum for the school’s various religious communities.
  • Club Sports: If you feel that school-sponsored teams are too much of a time commitment or too competitive for your skill level, you can join a club sports team. You can find groups for nearly any form of physical activity, such as Michigan’s Aiki Jujutsu Club, which holds seminars to teach and study this form of Japanese martial arts, or Columbia’s Figure Skating Club, which reserves ice time and works with children in the local community.
  • Auto Club: Are you a gearhead? Groups like Villanova University’s Auto Club provide opportunities for car enthusiasts to work on vehicles, attend car shows and races, and host social gatherings, such as barbeques.
  • Multicultural Clubs: No matter what your ethnic background is, there is probably an organization for you. Groups, such as the Asian or African-American Society, are great networking opportunities for students, and they also welcome people from other backgrounds who are looking to learn more about that culture.
  • Career Groups: Looking to get a head start on life post-graduation? Colorado University’s Sports Marketing Club brings in speakers to discuss the sports industry for anyone that may be interested in pursuing a career in the field. You can use career groups to begin networking with professionals and gain contacts for job hunting after college.
  • Zombie Awareness Council: Just to show you that student groups run the gamut…The University of Kansas hosts a weekly group meeting to discuss zombie attacks and survival plans in the spirit of zombie movies, such as 28 Days Later. Activities include mock zombie attacks and awareness campaigns with the general student body.

Student Organizations: Tips and Tactics

  • Your participation will look more impressive on your resume if you take a leadership position or spearhead an event.
  • Check your school’s membership requirements. If you meet with a few of your friends to play games, watch movies, or partake in other activities, it may be all you need to receive benefits and funding as a student club.
  • If you’re starting your own college club, consider enlisting a faculty member to help supervise the group.


People Who Read This Article Also Read:

Student Government
Politics on Campus
Environmental Groups on Campus
Student Religion: Religious Groups on Campus
Academic Competitions for College Students
Collegiate Community Service

See All Student Organizations and Activities Articles

Quick Search: Find the College that's Right for You!

OR

Visit Our Student Center

Get on track!

Visit our Student Center

And find out everything you need to know about planning for college.