Where Did Pro Baseball Players go to College?

College baseball spawns many MLB players each year. Find out where some of the highest paid athletes went to college.

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Major League Baseball players weren’t born on the field. They had to train somewhere, and many of them did so by playing college baseball before the big leagues. Check to see where some of your favorite players from your favorite teams went to college.

Keep an eye out for any alumni from your school or one of the schools you’re interested in attending. Although some of your favorite players may have been drafted right out of high school, we’ve listed some of the main big leaguers that participated on a college team. Some of the great players went to community colleges instead of four-year schools—major league baseball players come from all types of academic backgrounds.

Although some of your favorite players may have been drafted right out of high school, we’ve listed some of the main big leaguers that participated on a college team.

American League East

Jorge Posada, designated hitter for the New York Yankees, went to school at Calhoun Community College in Alabama and received his Associate’s Degree before playing for the MLB.

Derek Jeter attended the University of Michigan.

Jonathan Papelbon, a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, went to Mississippi State

American League Central

Jim Thome of the Minnesota Twins went to Illinois Central College where he played both baseball and basketball.

Justin Verlander, a pitcher for the Detroit Tigers, played for Old Dominion before plowing through American League Central hitters.

Jack Hannahan of the Cleveland Indians went to the University of Minnesota.

American League West

Jered Weaver attended California State University at Long Beach before playing for the LA Angels of Anaheim.

Michael Young, the designated hitter for the Texas Rangers, also went to college in California—playing for the University of California at Santa Barbara.

National League East

Chase Utley, second baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies, attended UCLA. His teammate, Ryan Howard (only 90 feet away at first base), went to Missouri State.

Jason Bay, currently an outfielder for the New York Mets, went to Gonzaga University in Washington.

Craig Kimbrey, pitcher for the Atlanta Braves, went to Wallace State Community College in Alabama.

National League Central

Jonathan Lucroy, catcher for the Milwaukee Brewers, attended the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Carlos Pena went to Northeastern University before playing first base for his current team, the Chicago Cubs.

Teammates Albert Pujols and Mark Hamilton are both first basemen. Albert Pujols went to Maple Woods Community College in Missouri, while Hamilton attended Tulane University.

National League West

Tim Lincecum attended the University of Washington. After playing for the Huskies, he signed with the San Francisco Giants as a pitcher and continues to dominate the NL West.

Tony Gwynn Jr., who plays center field for the LA Dodgers, went to San Diego State University.

Major League Baseball Players Drafted From High School

Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees, Joe Mauer of the Minnesota Twins, and Chipper Jones of the Atlanta Braves all played major league baseball without ever going to a college, and are widely regarded to be some of the best players in the league: A-Rod - as a third baseman and slugger, Mauer - as a catcher and batter, and Chipper Jones - as one of the best switch-hitters in history.

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