College Clubs for Filmmakers and Movie Buffs

College Clubs for Filmmakers and Movie Buffs

Gain new skills and enjoy watching films with other movie buffs or be a part of your college's film-making community by joining a student club.

Student organizations have access to all sorts of campus resources, including high-definition televisions and projectors, guest speakers and famous alumni and state-of-the-art technology and equipment.

Do you find yourself watching movies with your friends in your free time? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be a filmmaker behind the camera? Colleges offer a variety of film clubs, which are a great way to meet new friends who share similar interests with you.

Check out these different types of movie and film-making clubs that will put you in the director's chair!

Movie Clubs: The Ticket to Film on Campus

Joining one of these student organizations might expose you to new genres, directors and pictures you’ve never heard of before. You may also get to work on your own feature that will be screened to the rest of the student body.

You don’t have to be Steven Spielberg to join one of these groups. In many cases, you don’t even need to be a film major. All you need is a passion for moviemaking or for watching movies.

Why should you join a movie club as opposed to simply making or watching your own movies? Student organizations have access to all sorts of campus resources, including high-definition televisions and projectors, guest speakers and famous alumni and state-of-the-art technology and equipment. Plus, it's a fun way to learn new and useful skills for a variety of careers.

Types of Campus Movie Clubs

Before committing yourself to a club, make sure you understand the kinds of groups that exist. Each of these examples focuses on different areas with different goals.
  • Tribe Productions is William & Mary’s film club, operated entirely by students. This group focuses on all areas of production, including acting, screenwriting and directing. In March, Tribe Productions hosts the CANS film festival, which screens 10-15 minute movies made by the student body.
  • The Cornell Film Club functions much like an actual class, without the stress of homework, exams and grades. Students, faculty members and the occasional guest speaker meet to watch movies and discuss film analysis and criticism.
  • Primarily a student group for viewing, the University of Chicago’s Experimental Film Club hosts three to four screenings of experimental and avant-garde movies each quarter. The group has access to the school’s prestigious Gerald Mast Film Archive.

Check your school's website or student union to find a film club on your campus!

Quick Tips

  • There are other opportunities to get together and watch movies in addition to student organizations. Be on the lookout for a weekly or monthly film night at your dorm.
  • Be careful with the movies you decide to screen. At Illinois State, a group showing foreign and independent movies received an $8,000 bill from the distributor for screening movies without the producers’ permission.
  • Your school may allow you to rent equipment if you’re planning to make your own motion pictures. Make sure you have been properly instructed on how to care for and use any such equipment. Breaking something can prove costly.

People Who Read This Article Also Read:

6 Most Popular Colleges for Prospective Film Majors
Student Organizations: An Overview
Honor Societies on Campus
How To Start Your Own Student Organization

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