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Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

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Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers Overview

An associate degree, certification or related experience will help electric motor, power tool and related repairers get jobs. Overall, the field is expected to grow more slowly than average compared to other careers. For employment, electric motor, power tool and related repairers must have knowledge of electrical equipment and electronics and many employers prefer an associate degree and require a professional certification.

Nature of the Work for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

Businesses and other organizations rely on complex electronic equipment for day-to-day functions. For example, antennae and transmitters can provide communication links for many businesses. These complex electronic equipment must be installed, maintained and repaired by electric motor, power tool and related repairers.

Also known as field technicians, electric motor, power tool and related repairers may travel to other locations such as factories to repair equipment. Usually, each worker is assigned an area to where they perform preventive maintenance regularly. They’re the workers called when equipment breaks down and needs to be repaired on site.

While most equipment has both electrical and electronic components, each are a distinct type of equipment. Electrical parts provide power and electronic parts control the device.

On the job, electric motor, power tool and related repairers first trouble shoot for common issues including obviously defective parts or loose connections. After routine checks they may refer to manufacturer specifications to look at connections and instructions for tracing problems. As automated electronic control systems become more complex, it becomes harder to diagnose problems. Repairers use software programs and testing equipment as well as a wide range of tools including multimeters that measure voltages, signal generators and hand tools.

Often electric motor, power tool and related repairers must retrofit older equipment with new automated control devices. This process can help the equipment run more efficiently and battle the problem of replacement parts that are no longer available on older models.

Electric motor, power tool and related repairers specialize in installing, maintaining and repairing electric motors, wiring and switches. In a specialty they may be generator mechanics, electric golf cart repairers or armature winders.

The work environment of electric motor, power tool and related repairers depends on the specialty or type of equipment they’re repairing on a daily basis. Some may work on a factory floor, while others may work in repair shops.

Heavy lifting and uncomfortable working positions are not unheard of. Safety is key, such as safety goggles and hardhats. They may also have to be sure to lock off power to the unit they’re repairing to protect against electric shock.

Training, Other Qualifications and Advancement for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

Knowledge of electronics and electrical equipment is a must for electric motor, power tool and related repairers. An associate degree in electronics from a technical school or community college is usually preferred though a high school diploma is sometimes sufficient. Entry-level jobs typically begin with electric motor, power tool and related repairers working under an experience technician until they develop the necessary skills to work independently.

Good eyesight and color perception will help electric motor, power tool and related repairers work with intricate components of electronic equipment. Those who work with customers should have a neat appearance and good communication skills. Some field technicians will need a driver’s license.

Many organizations offer certification. The Electronics Technicians Association (ETA) and the International Society of Certified Electronics Technicians offers certifications on several levels of competency and several specialties. Prerequisites must be met and an exam must be passed to qualify. electric motor, power tool and related repairers who are certified exhibit a higher level of competency in the job market and may have an easier time advancing.

To advance as a electric motor, power tool and related repairers, experience and advanced training can lead to jobs as troubleshooters or specialists who help other repairers diagnose the most challenging problems. Leadership skills can make electric motor, power tool and related repairers good candidates for supervisory positions. And some experienced workers choose to start a business of a repair shop.

Top 10 Most Popular Electrical/Electronics Equipment Installation and Repair Schools

1. Mt San Antonio College (Walnut, California)
2. South Florida Institute of Technology (Miami, Florida)
3. Wichita Technical Institute, Wichita (Main) (Wichita, Kansas)
4. Lincoln Tech, Columbia (Columbia, Maryland)
5. New England Institute of Technology, East Greenwich (Warwick, Rhode Island)
6. Industrial Management Training Institute (Waterbury, Connecticut)
7. East Los Angeles College (Monterey Park, California)
8. Contra Costa College (San Pablo, California)
9. Harper College (Palatine, Illinois)
10. TESST College of Technology (Multiple Campus Locations)

See All Electrical/Electronics Equipment Installation and Repair Schools

Employment and Job Outlook for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

Number of People in Profession

20,660

Changing Employment (2008-2018)

Employment is projected to grow more slowly than average (increase 3 - 6%).

About 23,700 electric motor, power tool and related repairers have jobs and many work for repair and maintenance establishments.

Overall employment of electric motor, power tool and related repairers is expected to grow slower than average at a rate of about 5 percent. Some employment growth will be spurred by the push to retrofit electrical generators in public buildings to reduce energy consumption and emission. At the same time, fewer electric motor, power tool and related repairers will be needed as electrical and electronic equipment design improves and there is an increased use of disposable tool parts.

Applicants with an associate degree in electronics, related experience or certification will find the best opportunities. Beyond employment growth, other jobs will open up as workers retire or transfer to other jobs.

Earnings and Salary for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

Median hourly wages for electric motor, power tool and related repairers were $17.44. The highest 10 percent earned above $27.88, the lowest 10 percent earned under $10.62 and the middle 50 percent earned between $13.79 and $22.16. The industry employing the largest number of electric motor, power tool and related repairers was the commercial and industrial machinery and equipment repair industry (excluding automotive and electronic) – those employers paid median hourly wages of $16.57.

Hourly Wage for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

On average, Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers earn $17.44 per hour.

10% 25% 75% 90% $10.62 $13.79 $22.16 $27.88

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook